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was in germany on official business. and shortly after general wheeler returned to the united states he suffered a heart attack, and was in walter reed. the only two chiefs who were asked about this dismissed it, one in very crude terms, and wheeler later told the president that there had never been such a meeting. so that is about as far as i can go with that controversial story. as secretary brown alluded to, we associate this period with mcnamara, and with vietnam. but mcnamara's involvement in a whole series of other crises, both foreign and domestic, is simply remarkable. we've heard about the dominican republic, the nato crisis, the middle east war, czechoslovakian invasion, demonstrations in the streets of the united states. any one of these crises could have defined a presidency. for example, if we look at president jimmy carter's administration, it involved notable successes, but it's best remembered for the iranian hostage issue. when the iranians took over the american embassy in tehran, and then held hostage americans for more than a year. think about mcnamara. in january 1968, the n
in this field. september 11th hijackers used united states and foreign financial institutions to hold, move, and retrieve their money. they deposited money into united states accounts via wire transfers and depp sits of traveler's checks and cash that was brought from overseas. they kept funds in foreign accounts which they accessed through atmst and credit card transactions in the home land. according to the september 11th commission, the plot cost al qaeda somewhere in the range of $400,000 to $500,000, of which approximately $300,000 passed through the hijackers' bank casualties here in the united states. after the attacks, the united states publicly declared that the fight against al qaeda financing was as critical as the fight against al qaeda itself. the charge of the united states intelligence and law enforcement communities was clear -- if we choke off the terrorists' money, we limit their ability to conduct mass casualty attacks. within months of the attacks, the department of defense, the fbi, the cia, and perhaps most importantly the department of treasury launched a swift and un
playing days. >>> we're in danger. the words of chen guangcheng now begging the united states to allow his family to board hillary clinton's plane to america. >>> would you pay $1,500 for a piece of stale cake? "cnn newsroom" starts right now. we do begin this hour with breaking news. with a rare and startling look inside the mind of osama bin laden. right now the public is getting its first look at documents seized in the raid that killed the al qaeda mastermind. they are in his own words. and they capture a fading leader desperate to launch another catastrophic strike on the united states. hundreds and hundreds of pages are now appearing on the website of combatting terrorism center at west point. peter bergen is our national security expert and was given early access to this so-called treasure-trove of material. what's been your biggest take away? >> i was able to review some of the documents that are being released today in the course of reporting a book i have written on the hunt for bin laden. the take aways clearly don't have operational information that would be useful to the cia a
: >> everybody wants to stay healthy. when i moved to the united states almost three years ago i could not find one that worked for me. i became inspired to bring a new definition of quality to the world. today it's working to fulfill our mission of bringing omega 3s to everyone because omega 3s are essential to life. >> citi turns 200 this year. in that time, there have been some good days and some difficult ones. but through it all, we persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. >> bnsf railway. >. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the mystery surrounding an escaped chinese dissident de
to say what is up there on the subhead -- debt is about a permanent part of the united states public policy in migration. -- death is now a permanent part of the united states public policy and migration. i have had the argument. we are not choosing that. you could tell that in 1998. maybe in 2000. but when you have the exact same results year after year after year and to spend no new resources to produce -- to reduce the number of migrant debts, it is now public policy. when you damn the organizations that are out there working to reduce the number of deaths, then you have said that is acceptable. debt is now a permanent part of the public policy -- death is now a permanent part of the public policy to deter migration. that, my friends, is immoral. it should not happen. let me just point out, there has been more than 2000 documented, measured, located death dots in arizona since november of 1999. some of those dots are on top of dtos. -- on top of dots. homeland security provided certain amount of information that about 70% of deaths in the last decade or so were found by other offi
? >> the civil rights section is a unit of the government that was created in 1939 in the united states, just before world war ii. when it was created, it was part of the department of justice, and then it was created, it was thought to be -- it's charge was to protect individual rights, fundamental individual rights. but people were not exactly sure what that meant. with a first thought it meant was labor rights. the rights of workers trying to collectively organize into unions. when world war ii started, race became much more prominent on the national political scene. the civil rights section started to think about how to protect the rights of african-americans. as a result they started to think about how to protect the rights of african-american workers. in the 1940s, it the civil rights takes a whole bunch of cases, and it prosecutes all kinds of employers for violation of civil rights causes. >> was informed by order or legislation? >> it was formed by executive order, franklin roosevelt, and at the request of frank murphy, who was the attorney general. frank murphy was a big labor guy f
built. thank you very much. we want to thank the lieutenant general and his staff with the united states of america vietnam memorial commemorative committee. the department of defense under the strong leadership of secretary of defense leon panetta has shown some really great leadership. they are making this day possible. this will be an amazing day that no one here ever forget. thank you for spending at memorial day with us. this ceremony will be unlike anything that has ever been hosted here before. this is indeed a special occasion for this memorial. i know that you will be moved and inspired. i want to be the first to invite everyone to come back for another wonderful event, veterans day as we commemorate the 30th anniversary of the vietnam veterans memorial. we will also gather across the street to break down for the education center at the wall. this is a place where heroes will be honored and the veterans of vietnam will be remembered and the veterans of iraq and afghanistan will be honored there. thank you very much to those of you who have served. i hope to see all of you in nov
to be back here. secretary of defense robert mcnamara came to personify the united states commitment in vietnam, and indeed, in many ways the ethos of the 1960s. he was the can-do man in the can-do society in the can-do era in david halverstam's phrase. in the early kennedy and johnson years, he managed the american commitment in vietnam almost as a desk officer, whether slogging through vietnam in army fatigues, spewing out statistics, or presiding at a press conference, and he came to embody what was known as secretary brown suggested as mcnamara's war. whatever the difficulties of the moment, he exuded a certainty that promised eventual success. in fact, we now know his public confidence far outlasted the emergence of profound private doubts about both the winnability of the war and indeed ultimately its purposes. and his departure from the pentagon in 1968, as much i think as lbj's march 31st speech of that year marked the glorious end of an era once bright with promise. as the war provoked increasingly nasty divisions in the united states, mcnamara became a target for critics fr
combat troops. a lot of afghans have been concerned about how the united states will remain here. this agreement basically says that we commit ourselves to supporting afghanistan economically. you know, we'll support its development and we will retain a number of troops here in a counterterrorism role in the post-2014 environment. mostly to chase after what's left of al qaeda. but this is a... signifies sort of a long-term commitment of the united states to afghanistan and more broadly to the region. >> ifill: even in the negotiating of this agreement, there have been tensions. of course we have documented all the tensions in the u.s.-afghan relationship, specifically with president karzai. was any of that in evidence today? >> not really. i think president karzai got pretty much what he wanted for his own domestic audience, his contingency. let's not forget that we had these very controversial night raids that they wanted the afghans to take the lead on. we signed a memorandum of understanding with the afghan government on that. there was a detainee issue which was a big stickin
be bad for patients who rely on these medications and bad for the competitiveness of the united states. so i'm glad that this reauthorization, mr. president, clearly aways some of the conflict and the underbrush and will reauthorize and strengthen and streamline the review time line for new pharmaceuticals. not only will this provide the kind of predictability and certainty any business needs to succeed but it helps make sure the f.d.a.'s essential regulatory process keeps pace with scientific innovation. in my home state of delaware, there's more than 20,000 jobs that directly rely on biomedical research and innovation, but around the country, it's more than 4 million indirect and more than 675,000 jobs that directly benefit from this area. it's also, frankly, one of our strongest export areas of growth for the long term, so we need this reauthorization now. in my view, moving forward with this legislation also means finding the fine balance between speed and safety, between getting treatments to patients without delay and being certain these new drugs will be effective and safe. in a
: the clerk will report. the clerk: pule j.watford of california to be united states judge for the ninth circuit. mr. reid: madam president, i ask -- let's see. i have a cloture motion. i want that reported, please. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the motion. clerithe clerk: cloture motion: we, the undersigned senators, in accordance with the provisions of rule 22 of the standing rules of the senate, do hereby move to bring to a close debate on nomination of paul j. wattford of california to be the united states circuit judge for the ninth circuit signed by 17 senators as follows -- mr. reid: madam president, i would ask that the reading of the names be waived. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent that the mandatory quorum under rule 22 be waived. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i now ask, madam president, the senate resume legislative session. the presiding officer: without objection. the senate resumes legislative session. mr. reid: and what is the pending business? the presiding officer: the motion to proceed to s
of the united states has actually been under fire while president of the united states, so abraham lincoln here, standing on the parapet looking out to see where the enemy troops actually were. >> you can watch this and other american artifacts programs site, c-span.org/history. and watch american artifacts every sunday at 8:00 a.m., 7:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. >>> the john f. kennedy presidential library convened a discussion on jfk and civil rights. in this discussion, this panel is discussing the president's actions on civil rights. this program is just over one hour. >> so, if we could have your attention. we'll now go to our next panel on the presidencies of john f. kennedy and lyndon baines johnson. so now it is afternoon. good afternoon. and remembering that we're honoring two presidents, george washington and abraham lincoln. here is a little something from abraham lincoln that seems fit for this afternoon. the probability that we may fail in the struggle ought not to deter us from the support of a cause we believe to be just. that seems to be very appropriate for our conversation
, that's false and ludicrous. now, my view on immigration in the united states and illegal immigration is formed from several different areas of experience. first had to do with my role as a staff officer for the third armored cavalry regiment, and providing active duty soldiers to assist with joint operations on a reservation which straddles arizona and mexico to help interdict the smuggling of drugs. it's also informed by my role as a life prosecutor prosecuting albany duis in maricopa county with the passage of an amendment to specifically deny bail to those in the country without lawful authority who committed serious offenses. anytime that i have someone who is a mexican national or even from canada, the accused of a felony dui, they would be admitted to bail in which they would feel to show for subsequent prosecution. then in supervising prosecutions are maricopa county, i dealt first in what circumstances in which drug cartels in mexico would order cars from street gangs in phoenix. which would then be picked up by someone who crossed the border, ostensibly as a one day tourist,
a former united states senator, an experienced nationally known sober steady republican named richard nixon is running for president. he wins in 1968. he wins re-election in 1972. he never makes it to the end of the second term because of a little complication called watergate. in 1968 he was at the height of his appeal and he was a communist. see his campaign slogan, forward together. see the slogan at the bottom. bushy haired richard nixon communist. the slogan indicates he's a communist because today's conservatives say so. i thought this was debunked already but conservatives even know, this is from last night on glen beck's internet tv show conservatives are still stuck on this. president obama's web video that came out ended with this slogan forward. the right just went nuts that the word forward was the obama campaign's way of signaling that it is marxist. it seems to impose the economic system by karl marx on america. richard nixon forward together, communist. also the washington, d.c. metro system is communist. and the state of wisconsin which has an awesome flag. the
. but the big issue is that european debt crisis, that is dragging down the united states economy and they are bracing for what happens next in greece, spain, places where the president has very little control right now, could have a major impact not just on our economy but at the election in november. >>trace: ed, thank you. early today, rebound called the former governor romney to congratulate him on clinching the g.o.p. nomination last night. the president said he looked forward to and i quote, "an important and healthy debate over the next few months." but don't expect them to stay friendly. campaign carl cameron is live for us in washington, dc, with more. >>carl: you do not want to expect a lot of civility between the rivals for the most powerful office in the whole world. president obama did actually give governor romney a congratulations call for locking up the nomination and a spokesman said "president obama said he looks forward to an important debate eight -- about america's future." it took planned parenthood less than a day to endorse president obama and launch a $1.4
other have worked together back in the 1990's?" maybe this is a complement to the united states. guest: cooperation between two countries is good. mill to mill relationships which we have lots of countries including countries that are not our closest friends, we used to have these relationships with pakistan and we stopped at our peril in our relationship with pakistan and that has declined as you are well aware relationships, especially like economic dialogue like hillary clinton and secretary of the treasury tim geithner had in beijing are very good things. what we should watch and a dangerous time his cooperative relationships where we will have competition like china and russia. that is what we should try to achieve. if we were doing and in the late 1990's, that is a good thing. host: this question is from twitter - guest: first of all, i don't call it the arabis spring. -- the arab spring. i called the arab awakening. the organizing events is the birth of the arab citizen. think about that. citizens of mellon fell other officials have not done well in egypt yes. it is an important
, and -- and eleanor is like, no, we must defend the united states. we cannot have our dirty laundry aired, and so part of that was the pushback in terms of burying this petition deep within the bowels of the u.n., but it was also in sending the signal to the naacp that all of this international stuff about human rights was not going to be tolerated, particularly in terms of human rights in the united states. we can talk about human rights that the polls aren't able to have democracy. we can talk about human rights that the east germans don't have freedom of speech, but we cannot talk about human rights in terms of what's happening in the united states, and so she resigned from the board of directors of the naacp, and it took all of walter white's efforts. i liken it to almost doing a james brown please, please, please. >> don't go. >> don't go. >> eleanor, please, don't go. >> yeah. that's what i mean about your allies can only take you so far. there are things that she could do. there were things she could not do and would not do and the naacp needed to understand that as it was crafting its strategy
and the missouri both had several hundred years of contact with french traders by the time the united states came along. so there were people in the tribe that could read french extremely fluently. speak it, read it, whatever. so the letters that he sent out, he sent them in that language because it was pretty much a universal language at the time. the otos and the missouris were kind of a small tribe in that they had a lot of he enemies and so they were always looking for allies and resources. so when they came along, lewis and clark saw this as them notifying that the united states now owns this territory and you're under our control or whatever. the otos saw that as a very important and potentially powerful ally against their enemies. so this was important to them. and that's probably why they kept it. lewis and clark, they met with several oto leaders at that time. one was big ax and one was big horse. now, this is the certificate of friendship that was given to big ax. and you can see his name right here. >> what does this say? >> it basically just says that the man named big ax is a friend
of the united states thinks this is an important thing and he wanted to affirm it. then on top of that, if we ever have something go to the supreme court, i think it will be very important what the highest office holder in our land thinks about same-sex marriage as well as the polling, as well as how many states have legalized it. we like to pretend that the supreme court lives in a bubble but they do not. those justices live among us. >> woodruff: kerry eleveld, thank you very much. >> thank you. we get two views now on the president's announcement and its significance. evan wolfson is the president and founder of freedom to marry, a leading organization seeking to legalize same-sex marriage in states around the country. and the reverend harry jackson is senior pastor of hope christian church in beltsville, maryland, presiding bishop of the international communion of evangelical churches, and an outspoken opponent of gay marriage. reverend jackson, what does it mean to you what the president said? >> well, i believe he's been dealing with this for a long time and the motivation was to ramp u
. >> meanwhile, the chinese government demand an apology from the united states. the foreign minister said: in the meantime, security was tight outside the hospital where chen is being treated, and the hospital's name was quickly banned as a search term on the chinese internet. we take a closer look now at this still unfolding story with shao chung, director of the berkeley-china internet project at u.c. berkeley, and editor of the "china digital times," an online publication. and evan osnos, who's written on chen guangcheng and other dissidents as the china correspondent for the "new yorker" magazine. he joins us tonight from the campus of stanford university. os, i'll start with you. what do you make of this very confusing series of events today? is there any way to unravel what's known at this point? >> well, it's been an extraordinary 24 hours. the story is very dynamic. a few hours ago, frankly, all of us thought that the u.s. government, the chinese side, had reached perhaps the best available solution given the moment, which was to create an opportunity for chen guangcheng to get o
it, protecting the president of the united states and other high officials of our government, as well as foreign leaders who visit the united states. that reputation, a great reputation, was badly stained last month won 11 secret service employees engaged in at night of heavy drinking in cartagena, colombia, which ended with them taking foreign nationals, women, back to their hotel rooms. we have called this hearing as part of our committee's responsibility to oversee the functions of the federal government, particularly those within the department of homeland security the united states secret service agents. there are three things we hope to accomplish today, and in our committee's ongoing investigation. first, we want to get the facts about what precisely happened in cartagena, and where the secret service's own investigation of cartagena at stands today. as widely reported, the misconduct involved 11 agents and officers who arrived in cartagena the morning of wednesday, april 11, and were off duty the rest of the day. the men went out in groups of a 2, 3 com and four to four differ
will support and defend the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that will bear -- to the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california. that i take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion. i will faithfully discharge the duties upon which i am about to enter during such time as i hold the office of -- for the city and county of san francisco. congratulations and thank you. [applause] >> tonight, we paid for the two teachers, especially those in san francisco public schools who have made san francisco the top- performing urban school district in california. each day, thousands of teachers provide children with the skills to be successful in life, including learning how to analyze problems, appreciate the arts, and become active in sports. we all know how important teachers are. that is why the giants continue to participate in the annual thank a teacher today campaign, a month-long celebration of san francisco public school teachers. i
and credit of the united states government. >> reporter: now, wolf, an aide to speaker boehner said that president obama said that he would not go along with any spending cuts in order to increase the debt ceiling and then we heard something different from minority leader nancy pelosi who said that the president was trying to talk about balance, meaning compromise and maybe some tax increasesas well as some spending cuts. so we're getting differing versions of what was discussed at the meeting. >> the speaker did leave one opening there, brian a that he would not accept any tax rate increases and there would be tax revenue from tax reform, there were loopholes, for example, that's one area that they may be able to get to some sort of agreement. it was six, seven months and not such a long time and it was a tough time during the lame duck session. thanks very much brianna keilar at the white house. over at the u.s. senate they've been spending the day spinning their wheels in heated debates. let's take a closer look on the senate chamber where they're voting on five different plans w
for individuals who immigrate to the united states on fiance visa and subjected to an abusive relationship. not only does the house bill miss these opportunities but it would remove the current accountality agreement for protections who still have immigrant status. it would inexplicablely reduce violence reporting requirements on colleges and universities. these are all tools widely used and supported by law enforcement officials to help keep communities safe by prosecuting criminals and protecting victims. the house bill would decentralize the violence against women immigration adjudication process, bypassing examiners who are trained in domestic violence and sexual assault instead mandating additional interviews on battered immigrants. these are people who usually have very limited options to protect themselves. we should not complicate the lives of some of the most vulnerable people in the united states. these victims of violence, usually women in the most difficult of circumstances, will be burdened, hindered and discouraged from seek
% of consumption in the united states, the lion's share of that, 45% of total consumption was in passenger vehicles and light-duty trucks. what do we do about that gas guzzling that is going on? the thing we do is to look at how we can change how many miles to the gallon we get. and two, -- and to the president's credit, his administration has put in place these new standards, known to all of us as cafe standards that will double the u.s. efficiency of fleet of automobiles averaging a fleet-wide average of 54.5 miles per gallon by the year 2025. what does that do once we get there in 2025? that means we as consumers will save $1.7 trillion at the pump over the life of the program. a family that purchases a new vehicle in 2025 will save $8,200 in fuel costs when compared with a similar vehicle in 2010. so the life of the program, the standard will save 12 billion barrels of oil and eliminate 6 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide pollution. the solutions are there for us. the solutions are we move to these cafe standards and address the issues around speculation and we keep the robust doing that is
behind you could be a future president of the united states, or, even, better than that, the mayor of new york city. the guy sitting to your right could be a future nobel laureate. ok, maybe not the guy to your right, but certainly the one to your left. >> memorial day weekend, commencement speeches, sharing their thoughts with graduating classes of 2012, saturday through tuesday at noon and 10:00 p.m. eastern. >> the head of the secret service apologized today for the incident involving agents and prostitutes in colombia, but mark sullivan disputed reports this was more than isolated incident. he testified for more than two hours. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the hearing will come to order. good morning, and thanks to those who are here, particularly director mark sullivan of the united states secret service, and charles edwards, the acting inspector general of the department of homeland security. >> the secret service has built an extraordinary reputation for selfless and still the devotion to the important and dangerous work its agents do it, protecting t
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: the united states and other nations expelled syrian diplomats today, expressing outrage over the weekend massacre. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the newshour tonight, we have an on-the-ground report from the city of homs, and an interview with ambassador gary dewer from canada, one of the countries taking action against its syrian envoy. >> woodruff: then, two takes on the presidential race. we look at mitt romney as he secures the republican nomination after today's primary in texas. >> warner: and gwen ifill reports on the push by both campaigns to court hispanics. >> immigration is a big issue, but not the top concern for hispanic voters here in colorado and elsewhere. both governor romney and president obama are talking about the economy. >> woodruff: plus, ray suarez examines the use of drone strikes to target al qaeda militants, and president obama's hand in approving the list of terrorists to kill. >> warner: and as author toni morrison is awarded the presidential medal o
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 565 (some duplicates have been removed)